Writing ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ was a cathartic experience for me. I had suppressed much of my childhood until my early thirties when my children were primary age. That was when I realised that my younger years had been quite extraordinary compared to most of my peers. Talking to my friends and co-workers about particular events that took place in my childhood would have them asking me questions about it. The general consensus was that I should write a book about my experience. It was something I considered for several years before I finally took the steps to sit down and start writing.

In 2008, after receiving the news that my father had passed away, I decided it was time. I began putting words down on paper while trying to recall the events surrounding my nomadic youth. More than 30 years had passed since it had all happened, and I found it difficult to piece together timelines relying only on my memory. My father had abducted me when I was five and the Federal Police were enlisted to find me. I figured contacting them would be a good start.

I received the documents surrounding my case a few weeks later. For a fee of $40 I suddenly held the pieces of the puzzle to my scattered childhood. Reading the documents revealed many things to me and answered questions I had wondered about for 30 years. The information enabled me to piece together the path of my life. Flicking through the pages was like reading an old map of both my childhood and my father’s life, before I came along. The documents contained information that had previously been withheld from me. They revealed incidents that occurred that directly impacted me, but I had not been informed about at the time.

I catalogued the pages and began plotting the timeline. Once I started writing, all the turmoil of the past came flooding back. I was accessing the archives of my mind. I had shelved these thoughts and feelings many years before, buried them. And now I was digging them out and dusting them off. Turning the first page of my memories, I found the wounds had not healed.

I had an emotional backlog. Remembering all the hurt, fear and anguish reduced me to a blubbering mess. After a few months of writing, I put it away. I decided to give myself time to grieve my childhood. My husband and I had just built a new house, and I had other commitments in my life that needed my attention. I wanted to invest my time into those.

Fast forward to 2019 and my life has done a 180. My husband and I have pursued our dreams. Now living in a caravan travelling Australia, I am living a life of freedom, in every sense of the word. With time on my hands, I felt it was best spent doing something constructive, and so I decided to finish my novel.

I pulled out my laptop and sat down at my cafe-style table with a cup of Chamomile tea. I switched on the leadlight lamp and lit an incense stick. The ambience is everything when you’re writing! After reading my novel for the first time in a long time, I began editing. For the next twelve months, I wrote.

Two years later, after putting ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ through the process of editing time and time again, and designing the front and back cover, I decided it was ready to be published.

I chose the name ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ based on the idea that I was a puppet being manipulated by both of my parents, especially my father, and this was my story. Parental alienation, as seen through the eyes of a child.

To finally publish my book 13 years after starting the writing process has been a daunting experience. I’ve put my very personal story out into the world and it will remain there for eternity. I have feelings of immense accomplishment that I haven’t felt before. I started a project that only I was capable of doing, and saw it through to the very end. Becoming a published author is an experience I will savour always, and it has lit a fire in my belly to express myself through writing.

My second book, which I still haven’t chosen a name for yet, will revolve around my character Elona (me) from the first book, and where her life goes. Whereas ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ depicted the trials of parental alienation, my second book will portray the next chapter of my life, a heartfelt tale of tribulation that sets the course for the journey ahead.

I can’t say too much at this stage because I don’t want to give anything away, so I’ll have to leave you hanging on that one.

Until it’s completed I’ll keep tapping away on my keyboard, stringing words into a story, because it’s good for my soul. Sharing my story helps get the word out there about issues in society, such as parental alienation. It’s a topic that seems to get swept under the rug, regardless of the fact that tens of thousands of people are experiencing it every single day. And the repercussions can be devastating to those who are victims of it.

Writing ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ was a cathartic experience for me. I had suppressed much of my childhood until my early thirties when my children were primary age. That was when I realised that my younger years had been quite extraordinary compared to most of my peers. Talking to my friends and co-workers about particular events that took place in my childhood would have them asking me questions about it. The general consensus was that I should write a book about my experience. It was something I considered for several years before I finally took the steps to sit down and start writing.

In 2008, after receiving the news that my father had passed away, I decided it was time. I began putting words down on paper while trying to recall the events surrounding my nomadic youth. More than 30 years had passed since it had all happened, and I found it difficult to piece together timelines relying only on my memory. My father had abducted me when I was five and the Federal Police were enlisted to find me. I figured contacting them would be a good start.

I received the documents surrounding my case a few weeks later. For a fee of $40 I suddenly held the pieces of the puzzle to my scattered childhood. Reading the documents revealed many things to me and answered questions I had wondered about for 30 years. The information enabled me to piece together the path of my life. Flicking through the pages was like reading an old map of both my childhood and my father’s life, before I came along. The documents contained information that had previously been withheld from me. They revealed incidents that occurred that directly impacted me, but I had not been informed about at the time.

I catalogued the pages and began plotting the timeline. Once I started writing, all the turmoil of the past came flooding back. I was accessing the archives of my mind. I had shelved these thoughts and feelings many years before, buried them. And now I was digging them out and dusting them off. Turning the first page of my memories, I found the wounds had not healed.

I had an emotional backlog. Remembering all the hurt, fear and anguish reduced me to a blubbering mess. After a few months of writing, I put it away. I decided to give myself time to grieve my childhood. My husband and I had just built a new house, and I had other commitments in my life that needed my attention. I wanted to invest my time into those.

Fast forward to 2019 and my life has done a 180. My husband and I have pursued our dreams. Now living in a caravan travelling Australia, I am living a life of freedom, in every sense of the word. With time on my hands, I felt it was best spent doing something constructive, and so I decided to finish my novel.

I pulled out my laptop and sat down at my cafe-style table with a cup of Chamomile tea. I switched on the leadlight lamp and lit an incense stick. The ambience is everything when you’re writing! After reading my novel for the first time in a long time, I began editing. For the next twelve months, I wrote.

Two years later, after putting ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ through the process of editing time and time again, and designing the front and back cover, I decided it was ready to be published.

I chose the name ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ based on the idea that I was a puppet being manipulated by both of my parents, especially my father, and this was my story. Parental alienation, as seen through the eyes of a child.

To finally publish my book 13 years after starting the writing process has been a daunting experience. I’ve put my very personal story out into the world and it will remain there for eternity. I have feelings of immense accomplishment that I haven’t felt before. I started a project that only I was capable of doing, and saw it through to the very end. Becoming a published author is an experience I will savour always, and it has lit a fire in my belly to express myself through writing.

My second book, which I still haven’t chosen a name for yet, will revolve around my character Elona (me) from the first book, and where her life goes. Whereas ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ depicted the trials of parental alienation, my second book will portray the next chapter of my life, a heartfelt tale of tribulation that sets the course for the journey ahead.

I can’t say too much at this stage because I don’t want to give anything away, so I’ll have to leave you hanging on that one.

Until it’s completed I’ll keep tapping away on my keyboard, stringing words into a story, because it’s good for my soul. Sharing my story helps get the word out there about issues in society, such as parental alienation. It’s a topic that seems to get swept under the rug, regardless of the fact that tens of thousands of people are experiencing it every single day. And the repercussions can be devastating to those who are victims of it.

Writing ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ was a cathartic experience for me. I had suppressed much of my childhood until my early thirties when my children were primary age. That was when I realised that my younger years had been quite extraordinary compared to most of my peers. Talking to my friends and co-workers about particular events that took place in my childhood would have them asking me questions about it. The general consensus was that I should write a book about my experience. It was something I considered for several years before I finally took the steps to sit down and start writing.

In 2008, after receiving the news that my father had passed away, I decided it was time. I began putting words down on paper while trying to recall the events surrounding my nomadic youth. More than 30 years had passed since it had all happened, and I found it difficult to piece together timelines relying only on my memory. My father had abducted me when I was five and the Federal Police were enlisted to find me. I figured contacting them would be a good start.

I received the documents surrounding my case a few weeks later. For a fee of $40 I suddenly held the pieces of the puzzle to my scattered childhood. Reading the documents revealed many things to me and answered questions I had wondered about for 30 years. The information enabled me to piece together the path of my life. Flicking through the pages was like reading an old map of both my childhood and my father’s life, before I came along. The documents contained information that had previously been withheld from me. They revealed incidents that occurred that directly impacted me, but I had not been informed about at the time.

I catalogued the pages and began plotting the timeline. Once I started writing, all the turmoil of the past           came

flooding back. I was accessing the archives of my mind. I had shelved these thoughts and feelings many years before, buried them. And now I was digging them out and dusting them off. Turning the first page of my memories, I found the wounds had not healed.

I had an emotional backlog. Remembering all the hurt, fear and anguish reduced me to a blubbering mess. After a few months of writing, I put it away. I decided to give myself time to grieve my childhood. My husband and I had just built a new house, and I had other commitments in my life that needed my attention. I wanted to invest my time into those.

Fast forward to 2019 and my life has done a 180. My husband and I have pursued our dreams. Now living in a caravan travelling Australia, I am living a life of freedom, in every sense of the word. With time on my hands, I felt it was best spent doing something constructive, and so I decided to finish my novel.

I pulled out my laptop and sat down at my cafe-style table with a cup of Chamomile tea. I switched on the leadlight lamp and lit an incense stick. The ambience is everything when you’re writing! After reading my novel for the first time in a long time, I began editing. For the next twelve months, I wrote.

Two years later, after putting ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ through the process of editing time and time again, and designing the front and back cover, I decided it was ready to be published.

I chose the name ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ based on the idea that I was a puppet being manipulated by both of my parents, especially my father, and this was my story. Parental alienation, as seen through the eyes of a child.

To finally publish my book 13 years after starting the writing process has been a daunting experience. I’ve put my very personal story out into the world and it will remain there for eternity. I have feelings of immense accomplishment that I haven’t felt before. I started a project that only I was capable of doing, and saw it through to the very end. Becoming a published author is an experience I will savour always, and it has lit a fire in my belly to express myself through writing.

My second book, which I still haven’t chosen a name for yet, will revolve around my character Elona (me) from the first book, and where her life goes. Whereas ‘A Puppet’s Tale’ depicted the trials of parental alienation, my second book will portray the next chapter of my life, a heartfelt tale of tribulation that sets the course for the journey ahead.

I can’t say too much at this stage because I don’t want to give anything away, so I’ll have to leave you hanging on that one.

Until it’s completed I’ll keep tapping away on my keyboard, stringing words into a story, because it’s good for my soul. Sharing my story helps get the word out there about issues in society, such as parental alienation. It’s a topic that seems to get swept under the rug, regardless of the fact that tens of thousands of people are experiencing it every single day. And the repercussions can be devastating to those who are victims of it.